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25BMR




Products & Services Brand Management and Product Leadership Public Relations

Professional & Trade Relations Excellence: Optimizing Group Structure & Operations

ID: PSM-263


Features:

7 Info Graphics

20 Data Graphics

118 Metrics

61 Narratives


Pages: 66


Published: Pre-2013


Delivery Format: Shipped


 

License Options:
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Single User: Authorizes use by the person who places the order or for whom the order was placed.

Sitewide: Authorizes use of the report for a geographic site. All people at site can view the report for a year and copies can be printed.

Corporate: Authorizes use for the entire company for a year and copies can be printed. No limitations for usage inside the company.




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919-403-0251

  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • STUDY SNAPSHOT
  • KEY FINDINGS
  • VIEW TOC AND LIST OF EXHIBITS
Professional Trade Relations groups play a crucial role of influencing company’s reputation to professional, payer and patient groups. However restrictive compliance environment today is slowing the pace of nearly all PTR activities thus demanding them to optimize their structure and operations.


Best Practices, LLC conducted this benchmarking study to identify benchmark metrics, industry trends, pitfalls to avoid and success factors that help optimize PTR structure and operations. Additionally, it also provides effective best practices to optimize external collaborations with associations and societies. Executives and managers can use this research study to compare their current strategies with those at leading companies.


Industries Profiled:
Health Care; Pharmaceutical; Diagnostic; Biotech; Medical Device; Manufacturing; Consumer Products; Chemical


Companies Profiled:
Abbott; Mid-Cap Pharmaceutical Co.; Alcon; Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma; Amgen; Orthofix; Amylin; Sunovion; Bayer; Zogenix; Boehringer Ingelheim; Celgene; Genentech; GlaxoSmithKline; Hospira; Johnson & Johnson; King Pharmaceuticals; Lundbeck; Meda Pharmaceuticals; Lilly; Novartis; Novo Nordisk; Onyx Pharmaceuticals; Pfizer; Takeda Pharmaceuticals


Study Snapshot

Twenty six professional and trade relations executives and managers from 25 biopharmaceutical and medical device companies participated in this benchmarking research. Most benchmark participants hold job titles at the director level and above.

Qualitative and quantitative data for this report were collected through an online survey instrument.

Sample Key Findings

Respondents Indicated a Preference For Centralization Of The Function: Nearly 40% of respondents have centralized structures for PTR, and another 35% have hybrid structures that are often partially centralized. Among those with variations of decentralized structures (regional, therapeutic, etc.), only 8% are decentralized by brand.

  • Raising Corporate Awareness Is a Key Value Measurement: The effectiveness of Professional and Trade Relations efforts is measured by activity as well as brand and corporate awareness.
  • PTR Group Funding Flows from Multiple Sources: The majority of companies receive their PTR funding from brand and corporate sources. This multi-source funding approach is one reason that many organizations embrace collaborative approaches and cross-functional priority setting. Only 12% receive all funding from the brands.
  • Most PTR Activities Are Now Carefully Reviewed: More than two-thirds of the companies reported that most of their PTR activities are carefully reviewed for compliance. As a result, activity cycle times have slowed for 68% for respondents. Many reported that overzealous internal nterpretations of regulations have put unnecessary restrictions of PTR activities.
Table of Contents

Executive Summary, p. 4-15
Operational Effectiveness, p. 16-28
Measuring & Communicating Success, p. 29-36
Challenges & Hurdles for Professional Relations Leaders, p. 37-44
Organizational Structure, p. 45-51
Financial & Human Resources, p. 52-60
Pitfalls, Lessons Learned & Success Factors, p. 61-64
About Best Practices, p. 65-66