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Best Practices for Developing Critical Engineering Talent

ID: PHR-212


Features:

3 Info Graphics

24 Data Graphics

101 Metrics

18 Narratives

2 Best Practices


Pages: 57


Published: Pre-2013


Delivery Format: Shipped


 

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919-403-0251

  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • STUDY SNAPSHOT
  • KEY FINDINGS
  • VIEW TOC AND LIST OF EXHIBITS
As the engineering talent pool continues to diminish, companies are finding it increasingly challenging to recruit and retain employees in a competitive labor market. Best Practices, LLC sought to identify successful engineering development practices that could be adopted to help optimize talent development, recruiting and retention efforts.

Industries Profiled:
Electronics; Internet; Energy; Manufacturing; Consumer Products; Technology; Utilities; Defense; High Tech; Telecommunications; Aerospace; Financial Services


Companies Profiled:
Intel; Xcel Energy; Westinghouse; GE Lumination; Public Service Enterprise Group; General Dynamics; Xerox; Motorola; CenterPoint Energy; Johnson Controls; DTE Energy; Corning; Lockheed Martin; BAE Systems; L-3com; Raytheon; Rockwell Collins; Northrop Grumman


Study Snapshot

This study was conducted to identify best-in-class engineering development programs that companies could adopt to optimize talent development, recruitment and retention efforts. The benchmarks and best practices in this research will help executives plan and implement changes needed to reinforce engineering talent development. The key findings encompass the following areas of study:
  • Design & Effectiveness of Key Engineering Development Programs
  • Innovation & Best-in-Class Approaches for Today’s Environment

Key Findings

Extending Rotational Programs: Rotations are widely used, especially in early development and for leadership fast-track programs.
  • Enhancing Mentor Programs: Mentor programs are highly effective in growing talent. At most companies, mentor programs can be expanded to impact a larger group of employees at critical stages of their career paths. Also, companies must more formally manage and monitor mentoring and coaching relationships to ensure knowledge transfer occurs.
  • Fine-tuning Internship & Co-op Programs: Internships and Co-op programs are effective approaches to source new talent. Companies increase the number of new hires by engaging students with early job offers, structured mentoring relationships and part-time assignments. Some offer early certification of interns.
Table of Contents

Study Overview and Objective
  • Key Findings at a Glance
  • Benchmark Class
  • Internship and Co-operative Education Programs
  • Mentoring and Coaching
  • Leadership Development and Rotational Programs
  • Continuing Education and Engineering Certifications
  • Educational Resources
  • Involvement in External Organizations and Memberships
  • Knowledge Retention
  • Lessons Learned and Next Steps