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Products & Services ╗

Best Practices in Recruitment for Medical Education Programs

ID: PSM-238


Features:

3 Info Graphics

12 Data Graphics

75 Metrics

21 Narratives


Pages: 50


Published: Pre-2014


Delivery Format: Shipped


 

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919-403-0251

  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • STUDY SNAPSHOT
  • KEY FINDINGS
  • VIEW TOC AND LIST OF EXHIBITS
Non-Continuing Medical Education (non-CME) programs, also called promotional education programs, are an important tool to educate and inform physicians, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare practitioners.

New regulations and guidelines regarding medical education programs have made it more challenging to recruit attendees for both certified CME and non-CME programs.


This benchmark research project identifies emerging trends in recruiting attendees for medical education in general and non-CME programs in particular.
Additionally, this research seeks to understand industry norms for attendance goals versus actual attendance, average time for recruitment effort, effective recruiting methods and other operational activities.

Executives and managers involved in producing medical education programs can use this study to gauge the effectiveness of their recruiting methods and to incorporate emerging trends into their program characteristics.

Industries Profiled:
Education; Professional Services


Companies Profiled:
Diversified Medical Communications; BioCentric; Inc.; InfoMedics; CommGeniX; WPP; MediMax Communications; Scientiae LLC; Healthmatters Communications; White Cube Consulting; Phoenix Marketing Solutions; MedPoint Communications; DWA Healthcare Communications


Study Snapshot

Key Objectives
  • Assess the number of healthcare practitioners needed to recruit to reach attendance targets
  • Identify which recruiting methods are used most often and which are most effective
  • Ascertain whether companies are changing their approach to recruiting and, if so, how they are changing

Key Topics

  • Interview Insights
  • Non-CME Program Characteristics
  • Non-CME Recruitment Metrics and Tactics
  • Non-CME Recruitment Trends
  • CME Program Metrics and Characteristics



Study Methodology

This study was conducted for a member of the Best Practices, LLC Global Benchmarking Council. While most of this research relates to non-CME programs, some data were also collected for certified CME programs. A quantitative survey harvested current best practices plus emerging trends in recruiting attendees for medical education in general and CME programs in particular.

Key Findings

The Key Findings can be broadly classified under the following categories:


    • Benchmark partners recruited an average of 3-4 HCPs for every attendee at their most recent three non-CME programs. Email is viewed as the most common and most valuable recruiting tool.
    • Most benchmark companies reported spending 3-6 weeks on recruiting for their most recent three non-CME projects, although 20 percent of participants said they take longer (seven to eight weeks).
Table of Contents

STUDY OVERVIEW 3
Research Objective & Methodology 4
Study Definitions 5
Respondent and Program Characteristics 6
Participating Companies 7
Participant Titles 8
Companies’ Involvement in Continuing Education 9
Key Findings 10
Non-CME Program Characteristics 11
Non-CME Recruiting Characteristics 12
Non-CME Operational 13
CME Program Characteristics 14

INTERVIEW INSIGHTS 15
Program Topics Influence Attendance 16
Niche Topics Can Pull Attendance 17
New Products are Popular Topics 18
Attractiveness of Lunch Meetings 19
Changing Presentation Format 20
Sales Reps are an Area of Change and Challenge 21
Critical Recruiting Methods 22
Subject Lines on Recruiting Emails 23
Direct Mail Becoming Less Favorable 24

NON-CME PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS 25
Driving Revenues 26
Activity Revenue Mix 27
Specialties Represented/In Attendance 28

NON-CME RECRUITMENT METRICS AND TACTICS 29
Non-CME Versus CME Attendance 30
Non-CME Recruiting Ratios 31
Non-CME Recruiting Periods 32
Multiple Methods of Non-CME Recruiting 33
Email as a Recruiting Method 34
Sales Force as a Recruitment Tool 35
Recruiting/Advertising Costs 36

NON-CME RECRUITMENT TRENDS 37
Changing Recruitment Approach 38
Reasons for Changing Recruitment Approach 39
Additional Insights into Non-CME Recruiting 40
Challenges for Non-CME Recruting 41

CME PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS 42
Revenue Mix 43
Professional Specialties Represented 44
Recruiting Ratios 45
Interview Insights – CME Recruiting 46

ABOUT BEST PRACTICES, LLC 47

    List of Charts & Exhibits

      • Percentage of service revenues from CME and Non-CME programs
      • Percentage of Non-CME revenues from different educational activities
      • Health care professional specialties represented at Non-CME programs
      • CME and Non-CME dinner meeting attendance goals, professionals recruited, registered and attended
      • Average time for Non-CME recruiting effort
      • Frequency of use for different recruiting methods
      • Value rating for different recruiting methods
      • Proportion of Non-CME dinner programs using sales reps for recruiting
      • Estimated budget for Non-CME program consisting of 30 dinner programs with 20 attendees
      • Likelihood of change in recruiting approach
      • Percentage of CME revenues from different educational activities
      • Health care professional specialties represented at CME programs