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Products & Services Medical Affairs Medical Education

Continuing Medical Education: Best Practices in Content Delivery

ID: 5038


Features:

8 Info Graphics

8 Data Graphics

100+ Metrics

7 Best Practices


Pages/Slides: 26


Published: Pre-2013


Delivery Format: Online PDF Document


 

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  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • SPECIAL OFFER
Non-members: Click here to review a complimentary excerpt from "Continuing Medical Education: Best Practices in Content Delivery"

STUDY OVERVIEW

As new therapies emerge, Continuing Medical Education (CME) programs enable doctors and other front-line practitioners to discover and adopt the treatment options most beneficial to their patients. But physician attendance alone does not necessarily translate into retention of information, much less the implementation of effective new practices.

This Best Practices, LLC study found a singular challenge is a "resource, targeting and quality paradox" in which the most often used CME delivery channels and formats (face-to-face and lectures, respectively) are often the least efficient and lowest-rated for information retention and behavioral change.

This study probes the strengths and weaknesses of common CME delivery channels and formats. In particular, the study highlights the growing role that E-CME and the Internet are playing in effectively targeting physicians, tracking program performance and enhancing program efficiency.

CME leaders can use the industry benchmarks and executive narratives from this research to understand what are the most effective CME delivery channels and formats as well as the growing role E-CME will play going forward.

KEY TOPICS

  • Executive Summary & Key Findings
  • CME Evolution and the Role of Technology
  • Optimizing CME Delivery Channels
  • Delivering Effective CME Content

KEY METRICS
  • Current Mix of Delivery Channels in North America
  • Current Mix of Delivery Channels in Europe
  • Prevalence of Web-based CME, US vs. Europe
  • Most Effective CME Services (eg., symposia, lectures, etc.) in North America
  • Most Effective CME Services in Europe
  • Prevalence of Third-Party Vendors for Delivery of CME Programs, Europe
  • Prevalence of Third-Party Vendors for Delivery of CME Programs, North America

SAMPLE KEY FINDINGS

Use of the Internet and E-Learning to Deliver CME Content: On average, the Internet and E-CME are responsible for delivering between 10 to 25 percent of global CME content, and CME leaders estimate that this percentage will double over the next three to five years. Already, adopters are delivering as much as 75 percent of CME content throughout the Internet in the U.S. and 50 percent in Europe.

Effective CME Content: Despite their preference for face-to-face delivery formats, physicians benefit more (in terms of actual clinical behavioral changes) from programs with greater interactivity. Didactic lectures and slide shows, which are common to face-to-face delivery formats, were rated least effective for educating the market in support of company goals.

METHODOLOGY

Best Practices, LLC employed a two-pronged approach to this research: 30 CME leaders and practitioners from 26 pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies participated in a quantitative study and also contributed their observations through deep-dive interviews.


Industries Profiled:
Pharmaceutical; Biotech; Medical Device; Chemical; Health Care


Companies Profiled:
Alcon; Amylin; AstraZeneca; Baxter; Boehringer Ingelheim; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Celgene; Daiichi-Sankyo; Eli Lilly; Genentech; HemoCue; Janssen-Cilag; Merck Serono; Merck; Novartis; Novo Nordisk; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics; Pfizer; Roche; Sanofi-aventis; Sepracor; Talecris; Teva; Vianex; AMK; AXDEV; Indegene; Indicia Medical Education; LLC; Invivo Communications; Medimix International; WentzMiller & Associates; American Society of Clinical Oncologists; American Society of Hypertension; American Society of Transplantation; International Society of Hypertension in Blacks; Mount Sinai NY; National Kidney Foundation; University of California; University of Cincinnati; University of Florida; University of Wisconsin


If you purchase Best Practice Database document(s), you will have 30 days from the date of purchase to apply some or all of the cost of the document(s) toward the cost of a Full Access Individual, Pharma, Group or University Membership. Write us at DatabaseTeam@bestpracticesllc.com or call David Guinn at 919-767-9179 if you have any questions.