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25BMR




Products & Services

Effective Policies & Procedures for Managing the Workforce during a Flu-Like Pandemic

ID: HRS-1


Features:

n/a Info Graphics

20 Data Graphics

170+ Metrics

50+ Narratives


Pages: 40


Published: Pre-2014


Delivery Format: Shipped


 

License Options:
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Single User: Authorizes use by the person who places the order or for whom the order was placed.

Sitewide: Authorizes use of the report for a geographic site. All people at site can view the report for a year and copies can be printed.

Corporate: Authorizes use for the entire company for a year and copies can be printed. No limitations for usage inside the company.




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919-403-0251

  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
DESCRIPTION

This product is a two-piece bundle that includes (1) a cross-industry benchmark report on policies for workforce management during a flu outbreak or pandemic and (2) a one-hour webinar (on CD) covering the topic of Pandemic Preparedness.

STUDY OVERVIEW
With the possibility of a flu pandemic always present, companies face the temporary loss of large portions of their work force on any given year. While that’s a worrisome possibility for any organization, it’s especially daunting for public service companies such as utilities and telecommunication firms and for pharmaceutical companies that manufacture vaccines to prevent the spread of these illnesses.

Best Practices, LLC has completed two recent pieces of work on this subject:

  • A benchmark study that examines attendance and pay policies for union and nonunion employees who have been in contact with infected people but are not, themselves, ill. Benchmarking participants included 49 executives at 47 leading companies from the utilities, healthcare, pharmaceutical, government, entertainment, education, technology, aeorspace, telecommunications, finance and other industry sectors. Participants shared data and executive insights.
  • A webinar featuring presentations on pandemic preparedness by Mike McGuire, Vice President of Anti-Infectives at Roche, and Chris Bogan, CEO of Best Practices, LLC.

This benchmarking exchange was designed to gain insights into what policies or procedures that organizations in the U.S. have developed to manage their workforces during a flu-like pandemic. Disaster planning and personnel executives from all industries can use this research to compare - or begin creating - their own attendance and pay policies to address a flu-like pandemic.

KEY TOPICS
Attendance/Pay Policies for Union and Nonunion Workers
Return-to-Work Requirements
Travel Policies
Child-Care Policies
Planning Polices for Vendors/Contractors and Employee Questions

KEY METRICS
Respondents’ data is segmented in two views: the total benchmark class and the utility industry segment. For workforce policies, survey data is further segmented by union and nonunion segments. Data includes the percent of companies with:
Various Policies for Employees with Affected Household/Nonhousehold Members
Various Policies for Flexible Worksite/Work Hours
Various Policies for Sequestering Workers at Work Site to Maintain Operations
Different Types of Compensation for Nonunion Workers Working Overtime during Pandemic
Specific Return-to-Work Requirements for Employees & Family Members No Longer Infectious
Different Levels of Restriction on Travel
Child-care Provisions if Schools are Closed
Requirements for Vendors to Develop Pandemic Preparedness Plans
Policies for Contractors at Job Site
Different Plans to Assist Employees with Pandemic Questions

SAMPLE KEY FINDINGS
It is evident that a lot of companies have not thought through a pandemic scenario and have designed policies around non-pandemic type of conditions. For instance, half of the benchmark class require a physician release as a back-to-work requirement although doctor offices will be overrun with patients during a pandemic.

While half of both the benchmark class and utility segment said they would communicate with employees about a pandemic via in-house education sessions, use of a company’s Intranet would lessen the chance of spreading a virus among the workforce.

METHODOLOGY

This research was conducted on behalf of one of Best Practices, LLC’s Global Benchmarking Council clients and was based on survey results from 47 companies across 18 industries. The utility segment is made up of 12 utility companies.

Industries Profiled:
Utilities; Health Care; Technology; Service; Manufacturing; Consumer Products; Energy; Academic; Telecommunications; Financial Services; Pharmaceutical; Banking; Government; Entertainment; Consulting; Transportation; Biotech; Biopharmaceutical; Aerospace


Companies Profiled:
American Electric Power; Abington Memorial Hospital; Seagate Technology; ABM Security Services; Alticor Inc.; Advocate Health Care; Marvin Windows and Doors; Beaufort-Jasper Water & Sewer Authority; AEP; Cascade Regional Blood Services; Ashland Inc; Central Michigan University; Avaya; Clayco Inc.; Avista; Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.; Boehringer Ingelheim; Firestone Polymers; CenterPoint Energy; HCL Comnet Ltd.; Federal Reserve Board; Hershey Entertainment & Resorts; Florida Department of Revenue; Mercuri International Group; Hendrickson International; Nexen Inc.; Hyphen Technology; Oakland University; Norfolk Southern; Offset Paperback Manufacturers; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Ontario Power Generation; Siemens Medical; Quad/Graphics; Strattec Security Corporation; San Diego Gas & Electric & Southern California Gas; Tennessee Valley Authority; SaskPower; Terasen Gas; Inc; Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.; Boeing; University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers; Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp.; Verizon; Wells Fargo