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Products & Services Business Operations Research and Development Communications

Gaining Efficiency in the Product Development Process

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ID: 4863


Features:

Metrics, Graphics


Pages/Slides: 20


Published: Pre-2014


Delivery Format: Online PDF Document


 

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"Gaining Efficiency in the Product Development Process"


Study Overview

This study is focuses on examining speed and efficiency factors that impact the product development process. Specifically, this survey takes a cross-industry perspective to identify potential areas for product development process improvement through benchmarking. It will give product development managers unique insights into key trends in the following areas:

I. Structure
II. Roles and Responsibilities
III. Project Management
IV. Performance Management

Key Metrics

  • Type of organizational structure
  • Frequency and amount of formal project reviews
  • Percentage of outsourced budget
  • Level of decision-making authority
  • Prioritization of project evaluation criteria
  • Frequency of tool usage
  • Frequency of key measure usage

Key Findings

  • The vast majority – 90% – of benchmarked organizations do not employ centralized/compartmented product development function structures. More than half the organizations employ some form of decentralized structures.
  • Almost 50% of benchmarked organizations allocate less than 5% of their budget to outsourced activities. The remaining companies allocate greater than 10% of their budget to outsourced activities. In part, the difference in allocation can be attributed to the nature of the business, i.e., global companies tend to outsource more than local companies.
  • At more than half (62%) of benchmarked organizations process execution and improvement tend to be shared by multiple organizations.

Methodology

This research originated from a Best Practices, LLC Internet Benchmarking Exchange. It was conducted for a Global Benchmarking Council member and was based on surveys with 29 benchmark partners across several industries.


Industries Profiled:
Consumer Products; Manufacturing; Aerospace; Banking; Automobile; High Tech; Chemical; Telecommunications; Computer Hardware; Consulting; Electronics; Professional Services; Pharmaceutical; Health Care; Computer Software; Computers


Companies Profiled:
Coca-Cola; Trojan Battery Company; Adhesives Research; Thomas & Betts; Inc.; Steelcase; Boeing; K. Hovnanian; CNH America; JCI; IBM; Guardian Telecom; Kemira Chemicals; Farnam Companies; Marvin Windows and Doors; Condux International; NMS; APM; Teradyne; Prolec; Trane; Merck; Armstrong Rubber Manufacturing; LSI Logic Storage Systems; W. R. Grace.

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