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Products & Services

Managing Sales Training to Accelerate Speed to Productivity

ID: PSM-219


Features:

2 Info Graphics

3 Data Graphics

37 Metrics

7 Narratives

4 Best Practices


Pages: 60


Published: Pre-2013


Delivery Format: Shipped


 

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Single User: Authorizes use by the person who places the order or for whom the order was placed.

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919-403-0251

  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • VIEW TOC AND LIST OF EXHIBITS
Though effective sales training is a valuable investment, it is being cut back out of economic necessity. Given this reality and the fluctuation of company needs and competitive pressures, training roles and responsibilities, resources, contents and evaluation are likewise changing.

This study of 33 companies compares how leading companies with large field forces manage sales training of new hires and managers. Throughout the 60-slide presentation, comparisons are made between sales training management in three groups: pharmaceutical companies with U.S. operations, pharmaceutical companies with international operations and companies in other industries -- which primarily include the manufacturing, telecommunications and financial industries.


Training leaders in all industries can use the results of this study to refine their training content and delivery, make better staffing and outsourcing decisions, more optimally allocate their resources, and measure the changes in the performance of the sales rep trainees.

Key comparative data includes:

* Types of content and delivery formats that are increasing or decreasing in significance
* Trainer span of control
* Staffing trends
* Roles and responsibilities by position within sales training programs
* Outsourcing trend and mix
* Sales training vendor qualities sought
* Sales training budget allocations and trends
* Ranking of performance measures used to evaluate sales training

In addition, this study reveals sample organizational structures, performance measurement models and companies' lessons learned.

A key finding is that the current mix of in-house development versus outsourcing for sales training for pharmaceutical companies is 75% versus 25%, respectively. The average percentage of outsourcing outside of the pharmaceutical industry is slightly higher at 29%. One of the reasons for this in-house focus is a desire to develop and leverage internal capabilities.

This presentation comes from Best Practices, LLC's Business Excellence Board research service.

Industries Profiled:
Pharmaceutical; Utilities; Biotech; Insurance; Manufacturing; Consumer Products; Diagnostic; Medical Device; High Tech; Chemical; Consulting; Computer Hardware; Computers; Telecommunications; Retail; Financial Services


Companies Profiled:
Abbott Laboratories; Nicor Gas; Allergan; ALTANA Pharmaceuticals; Anthem; Axcan Pharma; Bank of Montreal; Bayer; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Cardinal Health; Cisco Systems; DuPont; First Horizon; Forum Corporation; Genentech; GlaxoSmithKline; Hewlett-Packard; Janssen Cilag Pharmaceutical; JTI; Masterfoods; Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) China; Motorola; Norlight Telecommunications; Pitney Bowes; Procter & Gamble; Reliant Pharmaceuticals; Serono; Sunrise Senior Living; Symetra Financial; Telstra; Telus Corp.


Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION 2
Study Overview 3
Benchmark Class 4
Industry Profile 5
Key Findings 6
TRAINING CONTENTS & DELIVERY FORMATS 9
Training Audiences Served: Pharma 10
Training Audiences Served: Non-Pharma 11
Training Content Trend: Pharma US 12
Training Content Trend: Pharma International 13
Training Content Trend: Non-Pharma 14
Training Emphasis 15
Training Delivery: Pharma US 16
Training Delivery: Pharma International 17
Training Delivery: Non-Pharma 18
Training Evolution Model 19
OUTSOURCING 20
Outsourcing Trend: Pharma US 21
Outsourcing Mix: Pharma US 22
Outsourcing Trend: Pharma International 23
Outsourcing Mix: Pharma International 24
Outsourcing Trend: Non-Pharma 25
Outsourcing Mix: Non-Pharma 26
Vendor Qualities Sought 27
Vendor Report 28
BUDGET 29
Budget Distribution 30
Budget Mix: Pharma US 31
Budget Trend: Pharma US 32
Budget Mix: Pharma International 33
Budget Trend: Pharma International 34
Budget Mix: Non-Pharma 35
Budget Trend: Non-Pharma 36
STAFFING 37
Trainer Span of Control 38
Staffing Trend: Pharma US 39
Staffing Trend: Pharma International 40
Staffing Trend: Non-Pharma 41
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 42
Functional Involvement in Training 43
Roles and Responsibilities: Select Training Vendors 44
Roles and Responsibilities: Approve Training Budget 45
Roles and Responsibilities: Set Training Budget 46
Roles and Responsibilities: Design Training Content 47
Roles and Responsibilities: Determine Format for Delivery 48
Roles and Responsibilities: Assess Training Needs 49
Roles and Responsibilities: Evaluate Training Impact 50
Organizational Structure 51
PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT 53
Performance Measures: Pharma US 54
Performance Measures: Pharma International 55
Performance Measures: Non-Pharma 56
Performance Measurement: Case Study 57
Lessons Learned 59