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Organizing and Aligning Medical Education Roles in the Medical Device Industry: Optimizing the Structure, Resources and Activities to Improve in Medical Education Delivery

ID: POP-268


Features:

15 Info Graphics

28 Data Graphics

240+ Metrics

3 Narratives

10 Best Practices


Pages: 56


Published: 2016


Delivery Format: Shipped


 

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Corporate: Authorizes use for the entire company for a year and copies can be printed. No limitations for usage inside the company.




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919-403-0251

  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • STUDY SNAPSHOT
  • KEY FINDINGS
  • VIEW TOC AND LIST OF EXHIBITS
Medical device companies deploy medical education programs to inform health care professionals on the safe and effective use of devices. However, compliance pressures have tempered the sponsorship of some medical education programs by medical device companies, as well as some third-party providers of such services.


As the medical device industry continues to face a rapidly changing environment, Medical Education groups should reshape their approach to deployment of CME programs. Best Practices, LLC undertook this benchmarking study to examine emerging Medical Education trends at medical device organizations regarding funding and program types. This study also provides benchmarks around the proper size, resources needed and structure for Medical Education groups.


Industries Profiled:
Medical Device; Health Care


Companies Profiled:
Acelity; Elekta; Medtronic; Orthofix; Siemens Medical; The Medicines Company

Study Snapshot

Eight managers who support medical education at 6 medical device companies participated in this benchmarking study. More than 50% of participants are at the level of director/senior director, with another 20% being managers. Two-third of the participants are from the U.S.

Key Findings

A Hybrid Structure Is Favored for Organizing Medical Education Groups: Half of medical device benchmark partners use a hybrid structure for their medical education groups. These companies have oversight at a corporate level, as well as at a business unit.

Medical Device Focus On Non-accredited Programs: Device companies allocate 75% of the total Medical Education budget to non-accredited programs, of which 67% is for programs delivered by the companies.


Table of Contents

Executive Summary pgs. 3-17
Research Overview pg. 4
Participating Companies pg. 5
Key Recommendations pg. 6-8
Key Findings & Insights pgs. 9-13
Structure & Activities pgs. 14-19
Professional Education Investment Level & Funding Sources pgs. 20-31
Professional Medical Education Staffing & Benchmark pgs. 32-41
Changing Trends & Directions For Medical Education pgs. 42-49
Benchmark Class Demographics pgs. 50-54

List of Charts & Exhibits

Structural Forces Creating Changes in the Medical Education Landscape
Changes in Medical Education within The Last 2-3 Years
Medical Education Function Organizational Fit
Professional Medical Education Structural Approach
CME Leadership and Scope
Geographic Program Focus
CME Program Content
Ways to Gain Feedback from Funded Programs
Medical Education Resource Benchmark
Internal Medical Education Funding Sources
Regional Budget Allocation
Budget Allocation by Program Type
Distribution Channels Utilized To Support Accredited and Non-Accredited Education
Recovering Costs through Fee-for-Education Services
Medical Education Funding Allocations
Total Full Time Equivalent Employees (FTEs) Working in Benchmarked Companies’ Global Professional Medical Education Organization
Percentage of Programs Deployed In-house/Outsourced
Average span of control (Number of medical education staff per manager)
Regional FTE Allocation
Mix of Field-Based Employees
Total Number of Programs Supported By Professional Medical Education Group
Number of Grant Requests
Total Number of Programs per FTE
Budget per Program
Future Trends for Field-based Educators
Reasons for Increasing/Decreasing Funding for CME Programs
Medical Education Investment Change Trends
Funding Challenges
Critical Success Factors
Avoiding Pitfalls