1<!DOCTYPE html>
2
3Anonymous
4/bestp
5/bestp/domrep.nsf
6E78F69CEACD8537A8525759B00747BB5
8
9
10
11
12
13
140
15
16
17/bestp/domrep.nsf/products/the-economics-of-cme-key-issues-in-grants-funding-and-pharma-provider-collaboration?opendocument
18
19opendocument
2034.229.151.87
21
22
23www.best-in-class.com
24/bestp/domrep.nsf
25DB




» Products & Services » » Medical Affairs » Medical Education

The Economics of CME: Key Issues in Grants Funding and Pharma-Provider Collaboration

ID: 5042


Features:

6 Info Graphics

10 Data Graphics

88 Metrics

4 Best Practices


Pages/Slides: 26


Published: Pre-2014


Delivery Format: Online PDF Document


 

License Options:
close

Single User: Authorizes use by the person who places the order or for whom the order was placed.

Sitewide: Authorizes use of the report for a geographic site. All people at site can view the report for a year and copies can be printed.

Corporate: Authorizes use for the entire company for a year and copies can be printed. No limitations for usage inside the company.




Buy Now

 


  • STUDY OVERVIEW
  • BENCHMARK CLASS
  • SPECIAL OFFER
Non-members: Click here to review a complimentary excerpt from "The Economics of CME: Key Issues in Grants Funding and Pharma-Provider Collaboration"

STUDY OVERVIEW

Teaching hospitals and medical associations responsible for Continuing Medical Education (CME) programs for physicians will face pressing challenges in the coming years, particularly in terms of funding.

These CME providers are almost entirely dependent on the financial sponsorship of the pharmaceutical industry. As pharmaceutical companies adopt stricter protocols for allocating grants, hospitals and associations must marshal their very limited resources to interpret each company's funding requirements, write compelling grants proposals, and deliver useful educational content to doctors.

This research examines the current landscape of CME funding both from the perspective of CME providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Our study, which draws on a cross-section of benchmarking data and a series of executive interviews from both sides, explores how teaching hospitals and medical associations staff their CME teams, plan CME programming, pursue grants, and work collaboratively with leading pharmaceutical companies.

KEY TOPICS

  • Executive Summary & Key Findings
  • Funding Trends
  • Collaboration with Pharma
  • Obtaining Grants
  • Leveraging Budgetary Resources
  • Strategic Program Planning
  • Staffing

KEY METRICS
  • Number of Programs Sponsored Annually
  • Annual Funding Required/Received
  • Access to Funding
  • Grants Funding Trends and Obstacles
  • Pharma CME Investment Levels, North America and Europe
  • CME Group Staffing and Training Committments
  • CME Staff Tenure and Hiring Requirements

SAMPLE KEY FINDINGS

Pharmaceutcial Companies Provide Nearly All CME Funding, the Loss of Which Would Be Crippling to CME Recipient Organizations: Of the eight medical association and teaching hospital participants interviewed, six reported that their organizations receive between 85% and 98% of their annual funding from pharmaceutical companies.

Guidelines and Regulations Present the Largest Obstacles to CME Grants Funding Going Forward: Most groups fear that guidelines from organizations like the ACCME will negatively affect CME grants funding in the future. Sixty-three percent of the benchmark class predicted that, relative to now, ACCME would have the most impact on grants funding in the next year.

METHODOLOGY

This benchmarking study, based on benchmark survey data and executive interviews of 30 participants from 26 leading pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical education companies, was conducted to identify the salient trends and likely directions of CME in the North American and European marketplaces. The study also incorporates third-party input from seven CME vendors and eight medical associations and teaching hospitals.


Industries Profiled:
Pharmaceutical; Medical Device; Biotech; Chemical; Health Care


Companies Profiled:
Alcon Labs; Amylin; AstraZeneca; Baxter; Boehringer Ingelheim; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Celgene; Daiichi-Sankyo; Eli Lilly; Genentech; HemoCue; Janssen-Cilag; Merck; Merck Serono; Novartis; Novo Nordisk; Ortho Clinical Diagnostics; Pfizer; Roche; Sanofi-aventis; Sepracor; Talecris; Teva; Vianex; AMk; AXDEV; Indegene; Indicia Medical Education; LLC; Invivo Communications; Medimix International; WentzMiller & Associates; American Society of Clinical Oncologists; American Society of Transplantation; International Society of Hypertension in Blacks; Mount Sinai NY; National Kidney Foundation; University of California; University of Cincinnati; University of Florida; University of Wisconsin


If you purchase Best Practice Database document(s), you will have 30 days from the date of purchase to apply some or all of the cost of the document(s) toward the cost of a Full Access Individual, Pharma, Group or University Membership. Write us at DatabaseTeam@bestpracticesllc.com or call David Guinn at 919-767-9179 if you have any questions.